SocDem bibliography update: Four Jacobin articles

Today, the bibliography gets the addition of four Jacobin articles, published in 2018/2019, all addressing the strengths (and weaknesses) of social democracy.

Three Scandinavians (Andreas Møller Mulvad, Rune Møller Stahl and Kjell Östberg) chronicle the halcyon era of Swedish social democracy (and its failure to transition into democratic socialism) and highlight Denmark’s welfare state as a refutation of superficial American anti-left talking points. Jacobin staff writer Meagan Day continues the Scandinavian theme, arguing that the fetishization of the Danish concept of Hygge ignores the political realities of its country of origin. In a later article, Day challenges the notion that the U.S. possesses a welfare state of any real substance, instead relying on “an elaborate system of tax expenditures intended to facilitate private welfare provision.”

Collectively, the articles offer important insight into the much vaunted social democracies of Scandinavia and, with Day’s second piece, how that form of welfare statism has utterly failed to materialize in the United States.

SocDem bibliography update: The U.S. should look to the Nordic countries re: criminal justice reform

Latest addition to the bibliography: Categorically rejecting police reform in favor of abolition is a serious mistake. Americans arguing for the latter don’t seem aware that the U.S. criminal justice system and policing standards are vastly different from many other industrialized countries, appearing even more grotesque in comparison then they do on their own. Writing in The Week, Ryan Cooper (whose 2018 piece on Bernie Sanders and American Social Democracy is also in the bibliography) presents law enforcement in the Nordic countries as one such example.

For those who still dismiss efforts to emulate such models in the U.S., Cooper crucially points out the following: “Adopting the Nordic police model would be tantamount to abolishing the American criminal justice system as it currently exists — which is why it should happen immediately.”

SocDem bibliography update: Key workers and “exposing institutional blindness”

In the latest update to the bibliography, another great article from FES Connect: Andris Šuvajevs (a tutor at Rīga Stradiņš University and frequent FES collaborator) on the true value of key/essential workers, made clear by the COVID-19 crisis:

“It turns out that there are at least two kinds of work: essential and illusory. A good indicator of what yours is depends on the level of comfort you enjoy in the pandemic lockdown. The higher up the material ladder one goes, the less likely it is society would notice the absence of your labour.

SocDem bibliography update: The foundational texts of Lassalle, Bernstein and Rosselli

The bibliography now includes the seminal works of Ferdinand Lassalle, Eduard Bernstein and Carlo Rosselli (namely, The Working Man’s Programme, Evolutionary Socialism and Liberal Socialism), all foundational to the development of democratic socialism and, subsequently, social democracy. Thanks to the indefatigable Internet Archive, the new entries for Lassalle and Bernstein include links to the full texts of the works in question. As for Rosselli’s Liberal Socialism, I’d highly recommend purchasing the Princeton University Press edition, edited and featuring a lengthy introduction by Nadia Urbinanti.

SocDem bibliography update: COVID-19 makes clear how essential robust social protection systems are

Recently, the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung published an essay by the International Labor Organization‘s Shahra Razavi. She contends that the COVID-19 pandemic has made it inarguably clear why strong social protections (universal health coverage, unemployment insurance, etc.) are necessary to ensure not simply the protection of the population during a crisis, but that as many as possible can live a dignified and stable life, free from the fear of destitution via a health or economic shock. I’ve added Razavi’s piece to the bibliography since it’s a quality defense of some of the most basic tenets of social democracy.

SocDem bibliography update: Bernie’s place in the American progressive tradition and in the larger context of Western politics

Added a new article to the SocDem bibilography: economist Thomas Palley‘s argument that Bernie fits into both the American progressive tradition and larger Western social democratic movement, in addition to remarks on the constitutionality of his ideas. A good short read and a persuasive argument for skeptics still under the impression that Sanders’ platform is in any way radical.

New site, etc.

I finally said “fuck it” to my old page (which looked like something from 1998) and threw together this WordPress site. I’d like to post to this blog more often than not, but whether I have the time for that remains to be seen. In the meantime, check out my evisceration of Andrew Yang’s “Freedom Dividend” on my Medium account. If you’ve never checked out the SocDem bibliography, that’s also worth a look.