The campaign is over but the movement continues

In the span of half a decade, Bernie Sanders has changed both American politics and the American political landscape. Despite years of public service, first as a mayor, then as a senator, he entered the spotlight unknown to most Americans. Building off of and employing the vocabulary of Occupy, he proceeded to shift the Overton window in regards to the public’s attitude toward egalitarian, social democratic policy. He considerably destigmatized the concept of socialism in a country where the residue of McCarthyism and red-baiting still informed public perceptions of anything left of center.

Sanders created a movement and reinvigorated the American left. He lit a spark in people’s hearts and minds that can’t be extinguished. Millions of people now understand the necessity of an equitable system of government that enshrines the basic needs of healthcare, education and housing as rights. The current COVID-19 crisis is only making this more evident. And now, even though the possibility of a President Sanders is over, he’ll return to the senate and continue to fight as he always has.

Sanders has established a legacy that will likely be one of the defining factors in a further paradigm shift to the left in this country. We’re all indebted to him.

Image: Sanders at a rally in Mesquite, Texas, February 2020. Photo: Sanders campaign staff

SocDem bibliography update: Bernie’s place in the American progressive tradition and in the larger context of Western politics

Added a new article to the SocDem bibilography: economist Thomas Palley‘s argument that Bernie fits into both the American progressive tradition and larger Western social democratic movement, in addition to remarks on the constitutionality of his ideas. A good short read and a persuasive argument for skeptics still under the impression that Sanders’ platform is in any way radical.