SocDem bibliography update: Four Jacobin articles

Today, the bibliography gets the addition of four Jacobin articles, published in 2018/2019, all addressing the strengths (and weaknesses) of social democracy.

Three Scandinavians (Andreas Møller Mulvad, Rune Møller Stahl and Kjell Östberg) chronicle the halcyon era of Swedish social democracy (and its failure to transition into democratic socialism) and highlight Denmark’s welfare state as a refutation of superficial American anti-left talking points. Jacobin staff writer Meagan Day continues the Scandinavian theme, arguing that the fetishization of the Danish concept of Hygge ignores the political realities of its country of origin. In a later article, Day challenges the notion that the U.S. possesses a welfare state of any real substance, instead relying on “an elaborate system of tax expenditures intended to facilitate private welfare provision.”

Collectively, the articles offer important insight into the much vaunted social democracies of Scandinavia and, with Day’s second piece, how that form of welfare statism has utterly failed to materialize in the United States.

SocDem bibliography update: The U.S. should look to the Nordic countries re: criminal justice reform

Latest addition to the bibliography: Categorically rejecting police reform in favor of abolition is a serious mistake. Americans arguing for the latter don’t seem aware that the U.S. criminal justice system and policing standards are vastly different from many other industrialized countries, appearing even more grotesque in comparison then they do on their own. Writing in The Week, Ryan Cooper (whose 2018 piece on Bernie Sanders and American Social Democracy is also in the bibliography) presents law enforcement in the Nordic countries as one such example.

For those who still dismiss efforts to emulate such models in the U.S., Cooper crucially points out the following: “Adopting the Nordic police model would be tantamount to abolishing the American criminal justice system as it currently exists — which is why it should happen immediately.”